Ceramics

It is a great pleasure to share this amazing example of good architecture with all Facad3s followers. There is no formal boasting, no latest generation materials, no added gadgets for energy production, no raw land or straw. The building manages to be attractive by being clever, and sustainable by being reasonable. 

Unlike what stone, pressed ceramic tiles, or any kind of artificial panels -board type-, can give, extruded terracotta elements can, due to the manufacturing process, easily be three-dimensional!!! A possibility which architects not always take advantage of, even though terracotta is a common material in façade claddings. 

And pay attention to these difficult corners where three-dimensional elements may exhibit their hollowness!!

Have a look to the study Profiled metal sheets for the free design of continuous enclosures for the technical approach and to the Video that Hector Orozco sent us for the sensitive one!!

An exciting challenge by Mecanotubo.

Building construction in the second half of the twentieth century, up to the start of the twenty-first century in Spain due to restrictions on inventiveness imposed by regulations, is characterized by a proliferation of systems for the blind area of façade. All of them are supported as systems by the industry and tend to be prefabricated, dry assembled and fixed.

This could not be more adequate.

It is wise in the decision of being discreet, and acute in the selection of all systems and materials. The expertise of the architects as constructors is shown in the accurate design of all the points of relation between the systems and elements.

In the façade solution of this building we want to draw attention to two factors:

The façade solution for the Institut de Recerca of the Hospital de Sant Pau illustrates the collaboration of Pich-Aguilera Arquitectes with formalization very similar to that of the Leitat building. If we look at the naked image of the thermal and watertight envelope, the two buildings can hardly be distinguished. In addition, both are covered with a ceramic lattice that partially hides the inner closure from the sun.

The MACBA, the Film Library and now the new Massana school building: all of these are large public buildings inserted into a dense, small-grain urban structure. In the case of the Massana school, the strategy was to break down the volume into two bodies that do not even seem to be part of the same building, justifying the great hall.

From Ircam to Saint Giles, Piano offers a range of proposals for closing the façade with prefabricated panels finished with ceramic pieces. It is interesting to see how these initial concerns and approaches accompany him throughout his career: prefabricating the use of small-format ceramic pieces.

Pich Aguilera studio is one of the non-conservative teams that always attract our attention, due to the overall formalization of their buildings and the technological strategies they adopt.